Theme
8:16am October 1, 2014

There needs to be a little symbol that appears and hovers at the corner of your icon when you hit post limit, and which stays there until you can post again, because then you wouldn’t ever have to be anxious that someone thinks you’re rude for not replying to a post or comment. ;;

ALSO CAN SOMEONE PLEASE MAKE IT SO WE CAN STILL SAVE DRAFTS OR MAKE SCHEDULED POSTS WHEN OVER POST LIMIT BECAUSE WTF. I have to Like everything I want to reblog later and it’s really irritating.

Or. Y’know you could. Actually. Abolish the post limit.

8:56pm September 30, 2014
tocifer:

petpup:

this is possibly one of the most unfortunate subtitling jobs ive ever seen

yes perfect

tocifer:

petpup:

this is possibly one of the most unfortunate subtitling jobs ive ever seen

yes perfect

8:52pm September 30, 2014

scifi-reality:

here for brown girls, queer girls, shy girls, bi girls, trans girls, poly girls, disabled girls, loud girls, anarchist girls, riot girls, my girls, the quiet girls - the silent girls, the heart-too-big for their body girls, demi girls, fat girls, nerdy girls, sexy girls, messy girls, can’t-cook-to-save-their-gramma girls, proud girls, masculine girls, rowdy girls, girly girls, naughty girls, angry girls, surviving/recovering girls, healing girls, don’t-need-saving girls

8:51pm September 30, 2014

Jay Gatsby was black: an explanation

stevebuscreaming:

So let me explain this theory for those of you who haven’t heard it before already.

The Great Gatsby is a story of a man that makes his fortune bootlegging and throws countless magnificent parties all in hopes of attracting the attention of his old flame Daisy.

But it’s really a story about insurmountable class barriers. Daisy will never be with Gatsby, no matter how much she claims to love him. No matter how hard Gatsby tries, he will always be stuck on West Egg, only able to admire the ‘green light’ of upper class american romanticism from afar. 

Themes of insurmountable class barriers permeate the entire novel right from some of the famous opening lines:

Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.

And so here’s the theory: 

Jay Gatsby was black, passing for white (“High yellow”)

Lower class vs upper class. Old money vs new money. East Egg vs West Egg. White vs black. Don’t believe me? 

Not only was the insurmountable barrier between him and Daisy one of class and upbringing, but also one of race.

What we take for granted as Gatsby’s whiteness is actually a omission of detail rather than a specific indicator that he was white.

From the article Was Gatsby Black?

Thompson adds, “When I ask people what basis there is for Gatsby being white, I get silence. I have asked students, colleagues. They don’t know. They cannot give me any evidence to back up the speculation. And why haven’t people made this argument so far?”

Of course as with any theory or reading of a classic text, there’s room for disagreement:

Fitzgerald scholar Matthew J. Bruccoli has one answer. “Because it’s mishigas! If Fitzgerald wanted to write about blacks, it wouldn’t have taken 75 years to figure it out. If that’s what Fitzgerald wanted, he would have made it perfectly clear in April 1925. Great works of literature are not fodder for guessing games. This kind of thing is bad for literature, bad for Fitzgerald, bad for ‘The Great Gatsby’ and bad for students who get exposed to this kind of guessing game.”

But why shouldn’t we play a guessing game with it? We don’t have Fitzgerald around to verify any of these details so why not have a bit of fun with the text? It’s a very modern reading of the text and it makes it not only more relatable but more heartbreaking.

Everyone has their own reasons why they can’t be with their own Daisy.

Why shouldn’t Gatsby be black? And why can’t he really be with Daisy?

In this discussion about whether or not Beethoven was black, the point is made:

Another tight question along these lines: Was Jay Gatsby black? Again, it’s probably not literally the case (as Fitzgerald intended it) –- but what’s much more interesting is everyone’s utter inability to take it seriously as a legitimate reading of the text, which it is.

8:42pm September 30, 2014

originalheir:

Everyone today:

image

Everyone tomorrow:

image

8:42pm September 30, 2014
8:41pm September 30, 2014
funny-pictures-uk:

It’s just not polite!

funny-pictures-uk:

It’s just not polite!

8:35pm September 30, 2014

king-laloriaran-dynar:

Various Ayleid concept art from Elder Scrolls Online, artist: Jeremy Fenske

8:34pm September 30, 2014
opticallyaroused:


drop


Nodie Yang

opticallyaroused:

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